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Optically Coupled Binary Trigger

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098229D
Original Publication Date: 1960-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Musto, TL: AUTHOR

Abstract

The D.C. binary trigger comprises radiation generating elements such as neon lamps or electroluminescent (EL) cells and photoconductor (PC) cells arranged to perform a flip flop operation without the necessity of a rapid transient of the input energy pulse. This trigger, which responds to a light level shift in intensity but does not depend upon the speed of this shift, utilizes a simple circuit configuration that allows a wide variation of component tolerances. Any number of units may be cascaded to form registers, rings and counters.

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Optically Coupled Binary Trigger

The D.C. binary trigger comprises radiation generating elements such as neon lamps or electroluminescent (EL) cells and photoconductor (PC) cells arranged to perform a flip flop operation without the necessity of a rapid transient of the input energy pulse. This trigger, which responds to a light level shift in intensity but does not depend upon the speed of this shift, utilizes a simple circuit configuration that allows a wide variation of component tolerances. Any number of units may be cascaded to form registers, rings and counters.

Element A is the normally Off element and, when activated, indicates a 0 state. Element B is the normally On element and, when activated, indicates a 1 state. PC cells which receive their energy from a given element are labeled with the same letter as that element.

Assuming element A to be On and an external light source available to change the state of PC's x in the circuits of elements C and D, and since element A is radiating, PC's a and x in the circuit of element C are then at their low impedance states allowing element C to radiate. When element C radiates, it in turn triggers PC c to its low conductive condition holding element C on even after PC a is raised to its high impedance state. PC c in circuit A also reduced to its low impedance state, shunts and extinguishes element A. PC a in circuit B returns to its high impedance state and allows element B to radiate. PC b in circuit A then keeps...