Browse Prior Art Database

Vacuum System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098375D
Original Publication Date: 1960-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Compton, DMJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The apparatus permits the securing of a vacuum on the order of 10/-6/ millimeters of mercury through the combined use of pumping and chemical reaction operations. This is accomplished without the use of pump fluids and the resultant introduction of impurities from the pump fluids. It is effected by use of a flushing operation with a gas accompanied by an absorbing of the highly reactive gas with a metal that forms a low vapor pressure hydride.

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Vacuum System

The apparatus permits the securing of a vacuum on the order of 10/-6/ millimeters of mercury through the combined use of pumping and chemical reaction operations. This is accomplished without the use of pump fluids and the resultant introduction of impurities from the pump fluids. It is effected by use of a flushing operation with a gas accompanied by an absorbing of the highly reactive gas with a metal that forms a low vapor pressure hydride.

A metal 10, such as thorium, zirconium, titanium, lithium or uranium, capable of forming a low vapor pressure hydride, is placed in a container 11, which is enclosed in an oven 12, and connected through a cold trap 13 and a valve 14 to a tube 15. The metal 10 is covered by a diffusion type plug 16 of quartz wool or sintered steel wool. Uranium is used in the following example.

The uranium 10 is activated by closing valves 14 and 17 and evacuating the container 11, through valve 18, cold trap 19, oil diffusion pump 20 and high volume pump 21, to a pressure of 10/-3/ to 10/-6/ millimeters of mercury. After this the valve 18 is.closed and the furnace 12 heats the uranium to 225 degrees
C. Valve 17 is then opened and hydrogen is admitted as long as it is taken up by the uranium. Valve 17 is then closed and furnace 12 is heated to 400 degrees C at which temperature valve 18 is opened and container 11 is evacuated using pumps 20 and 21. This process is repeated several times and reduces the uranium to a very fine ac...