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Electroluminescent Trigger Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098409D
Original Publication Date: 1960-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sponsler, JB: AUTHOR

Abstract

The structure of this electroluminescent trigger circuit is shown at the right. Latches 1 and 1' include electroluminescent phosphors 2 and 2' deposited on conductive plates 3 and 3'. Transparent conductive layers 4 and 4' make contact with photoconductive layers 5 and 5' and the electroluminescent phosphors 2 and 2'. This establishes an optical coupling between the EL cell and corresponding photoconductor. Additional transparent conductive layers 6 and 6' provide the second connection to photoconductors 5 and 5'.

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Electroluminescent Trigger Circuit

The structure of this electroluminescent trigger circuit is shown at the right. Latches 1 and 1' include electroluminescent phosphors 2 and 2' deposited on conductive plates 3 and 3'. Transparent conductive layers 4 and 4' make contact with photoconductive layers 5 and 5' and the electroluminescent phosphors 2 and 2'. This establishes an optical coupling between the EL cell and corresponding photoconductor. Additional transparent conductive layers 6 and 6' provide the second connection to photoconductors 5 and 5'.

Light source 7 having electrodes 8 and 8' separates latches 1 and 1'. Although the light source is shown as an electroluminescent cell, other sources can also be used.

In the trigger circuit (left drawing), a direct current source 10 energizes the circuit through resistors 11 and 12. When the circuit is first energized from source 10, the EL cells 2 and 2' do not emit radiation, since the photoconductors 5 and 5' are in the dark or high impedance state. In the case where photoconductor 5 is pulsed with light from an external source, the reduced resistance allows EL 2 to draw current through resistor 13 and emit radiation which changes photoconductor 5 to a low resistance value. The resultant lower potential at terminal 4 causes capacitor 14 to be charged through a path including resistors 11 and 15. This places the circuit in a stable state with EL 2 illuminated and EL 2' dark.

When switch 16 is closed, D. C. source 17...