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Unbalanced Esaki Diode Logic

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098441D
Original Publication Date: 1960-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gruodis, AJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The circuit allows the use of output coupling networks of lower impedance than other types of Esaki diode logical connections, and so provides a larger branching factor. Esaki diode D1 is a low current diode having its peak current closely controlled while diode D2 is a high current unit with a closely controlled valley current. The curves show the composite characteristic.

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Unbalanced Esaki Diode Logic

The circuit allows the use of output coupling networks of lower impedance than other types of Esaki diode logical connections, and so provides a larger branching factor.

Esaki diode D1 is a low current diode having its peak current closely controlled while diode D2 is a high current unit with a closely controlled valley current. The curves show the composite characteristic.

The power supply is chosen so that initially D1 is in its low voltage state, point
A. Inputs applied to the resistor network, which may provide the AND or OR function, switch D1 to its high voltage state. This in turn forces D2 to assume its low voltage state, since the power supply voltage allows only one diode to be in its high voltage state. The circuit is now at point B on the curve.

The curves indicate D2 is now biased in the lower part of the low voltage portion of its characteristic. This allows a considerable amount of current to be drawn by an output coupling network before the peak value is approached. The steepness of the low voltage portion of the characteristic provides a large amount of current (Delta I) for a small change in voltage (Delta V). At the same time, D1 is biased high on the high voltage portion of its characteristic, allowing the voltage to be reduced by a large margin before the valley point is approached. Thus, the circuit thereby provides power gain.

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