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Program Ring

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098476D
Original Publication Date: 1960-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cooper, FR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Sequential operations of a logical machine are programmable by a program ring which produces signals ABCD in sequence. Signal A initiates specific operation A; signal B initiates operation B. Signals C and D initiate operations specific to each. In normal operation, the program ring, though capable of stepping in the microsecond range, steps through its sequence in response to advance pulses which occur in the millisecond range.

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Program Ring

Sequential operations of a logical machine are programmable by a program ring which produces signals ABCD in sequence. Signal A initiates specific operation A; signal B initiates operation B. Signals C and D initiate operations specific to each. In normal operation, the program ring, though capable of stepping in the microsecond range, steps through its sequence in response to advance pulses which occur in the millisecond range.

During certain operation sequences, program steps B and C are not required. Machine decision elements (not shown) set the skip triggers which condition the upper inputs of AND circuits X and Y. Upon a particular ring advance pulse, the program ring steps to stage B, conditioning the related input to AND circuit X. The program ring, which normally remains in stage B until the next advance pulse, steps to stage C as the next high-speed advance pulse completes coincident conditioning of AND X. The output of AND X traverses the OR circuit to impulse the program ring. When the program ring steps to stage C, with the skip triggers effective, AND circuit Y is preconditioned to gate the next high- speed advance pulse through the OR circuit to advance the ring. The ring advances normally at millisecond speed; it skips through undesired stages at microsecond speed.

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