Browse Prior Art Database

First Alarm Indicator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098508D
Original Publication Date: 1960-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wood, JR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Indicators are used to aid human and machine recognition of errors detected in digital computers. At times several error indications or alarms may occur before remedial action can be taken. It is desirable for diagnostic purposes to know which alarm occurred first, as this indicates the origin of the malfunction.

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First Alarm Indicator

Indicators are used to aid human and machine recognition of errors detected in digital computers. At times several error indications or alarms may occur before remedial action can be taken. It is desirable for diagnostic purposes to know which alarm occurred first, as this indicates the origin of the malfunction.

Logic for determining the identity of the first alarm indication in a computer establishes: (1) which instruction was being processed at the time the alarm occurred, (2) the time pulse at which the alarm occurred during the execution of the instruction, and (3) which alarm occurred first. Information on the first alarm is preserved for reference.

All alarms are applied to the input gates of alarm display register 1 to set the specific flip flop indicating the alarm received. Each alarm occurring at the same time pulse activates its flip flop. The input gate control 2 deconditions the input gates 3 after the first alarm. The instruction being processed is transferred from the instruction register through input gates 5 to instruction display register 6. After an alarm, the register input gate control 7 deconditions the input gates 5 so that the instruction display register 6 remains unchanged. A time display register 8 is continuously stepped by the time pulse distributor 9 until an alarm occurs. Then the input gates 10 are deconditioned by the input gate control 11 so the time display register retains the time at which the first alar...