Browse Prior Art Database

Pulse Generator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098661D
Original Publication Date: 1959-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dill, HG: AUTHOR

Abstract

The pulse generator illustrated comprises a plurality of like stages operated in sequence. A common output providing a train of pulses is available as well as individual outputs from each stage.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 80% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Pulse Generator

The pulse generator illustrated comprises a plurality of like stages operated in sequence. A common output providing a train of pulses is available as well as individual outputs from each stage.

Each stage includes a transistor T having its emitter-base junction reverse biased, +V(e) being smaller than the voltage applied to the base from +V(b) through the voltage divider. With the transistor thus biased, V can be made relatively high without excessive I(co). A positive pulse applied to the emitter then precipitates avalanche breakdown and the transistor goes into saturation rapidly with a resultant steep rise in collector voltage. Recovery of the transistor is relatively slow because of carrier storage effects and circuit time constants, and differentiating networks are provided to produce sharp output pulses. Two such networks are provided: R(1)C(1)produces a pulse each time its associated transistor is fired, while RC(2) is a common output producing a train of pulses from the stages in sequence.

Sequential operation of the stages is accomplished by means of transformer X, diode D, and capacitor C(3). When T is non-conducting, any charge on C(3) is dissipated through D. Upon conduction of T, D becomes reverse biased and C(3) becomes charged through R(2) from +V. As soon as this charge exceeds its base potential, the succeeding transistor breaks down and the cycle repeats. The magnitude of C(3) determines the spacing between successive pulses.

As...