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Opto-Electromechanical Digital Positions Comparator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098844D
Original Publication Date: 1958-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Litz, FA: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention relates to a device for indicating the discrete rotational position of a drum attached to a shaft. An address register comprising a plurality of bistable elements, such as switches, is continuously compared with the presence or absence of coded holes and digital locations in the drum until complete correspondence between all switches of the address register and all digital locations is achieved, thereby indicating the arrival of the shaft at its rotary destination; i.e., address. The circuitry shown performs unambiguous comparison of the address register to the drum position in that it performs the following logic: A * B + Bar A * Bar B = C (i.e., firing of a neon).

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Opto-Electromechanical Digital Positions Comparator

This invention relates to a device for indicating the discrete rotational position of a drum attached to a shaft. An address register comprising a plurality of bistable elements, such as switches, is continuously compared with the presence or absence of coded holes and digital locations in the drum until complete correspondence between all switches of the address register and all digital locations is achieved, thereby indicating the arrival of the shaft at its rotary destination; i.e., address. The circuitry shown performs unambiguous comparison of the address register to the drum position in that it performs the following logic: A * B + Bar A * Bar B = C (i.e., firing of a neon). For the above purpose the presence of a hole in the drum represents a binary 1 and the absence of a hole represents a 0, whereas in the address register coupling a switch to the 150 volt source indicates a 1 and to the 70 volt source 0. As seen in the drawing, neon bulbs are arranged to shine upon an associated photoconductor to lower its resistance whenever the binary condition of a switch in the address register corresponds to the binary condition of the digital position of the code holes in the drum, and all neons must be fired in order to produce E. Positioning accuracy is dependent upon the hole diameter used.

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