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Self-Optimizing Control For a Servo-Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098853D
Original Publication Date: 1958-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dickinson, WE: AUTHOR

Abstract

The problem herein solved concerns an arrangement for minimizing the access time required by a servo-mechanism for moving a part such as a transducer arm to a desired location. A servo-positioning device may be moved under full power forward until a time just prior to the desired position, whereupon the drive motor may be reversed to function as a brake. If the motor is reversed too soon, the access time will be prolonged because the final movement of the arm will be unduly slow. If the motor is reversed too late, the arm will over shoot the desired position, and a period of oscillation or hunting will prolong the access time. The above circuit continually optimizes the servo control preventing both of these undesirable conditions.

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Self-Optimizing Control For a Servo-Mechanism

The problem herein solved concerns an arrangement for minimizing the access time required by a servo-mechanism for moving a part such as a transducer arm to a desired location. A servo-positioning device may be moved under full power forward until a time just prior to the desired position, whereupon the drive motor may be reversed to function as a brake. If the motor is reversed too soon, the access time will be prolonged because the final movement of the arm will be unduly slow. If the motor is reversed too late, the arm will over shoot the desired position, and a period of oscillation or hunting will prolong the access time. The above circuit continually optimizes the servo control preventing both of these undesirable conditions.

The block diagram above shows a null detector 1 which will produce a zero error voltage when the access arm comes to its desired position. A single shot multivibrator 2 then produces a pulse, and if the arm continues to move or overshoot beyond its desired position, the null detector 1 will produce a voltage during the pulse time of the multivibrator 2 and an AND circuit 3 will cause a step motor 4 to function. When the step motor 4 operates, it causes a substantial negative movement through a gear differential 5 to vary a servo control adjustment 6. Meanwhile, a clock motor 7 operates continuously to give small incremental positive adjustments through the gear differential 5 to the servo c...