Browse Prior Art Database

Memory Plane Having Combination Sense Inhibit Winding

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098966D
Original Publication Date: 1960-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Constantine, G: AUTHOR

Abstract

IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 2, No. 4, December 1959, page 125 shows an improved sense winding for core matrices. The arrangement shown above uses such a winding for the dual purpose of inhibiting a memory plane during writing operations and for sensing during reading operations, without loss of efficiency.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Memory Plane Having Combination Sense Inhibit Winding

IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 2, No. 4, December 1959, page 125 shows an improved sense winding for core matrices. The arrangement shown above uses such a winding for the dual purpose of inhibiting a memory plane during writing operations and for sensing during reading operations, without loss of efficiency.

The combination sense-inhibit winding is connected to a reference potential at its midpoint, dividing it into two equal segments each of which passes through half of the cores in the plane. Inhibit drivers are connected to the two segments to pass currents in the directions shown by the arrows i(z). A sense amplifier is connected in parallel with the inhibit drivers across the entire line. The memory cores are arranged in a herringbone pattern, the cores of alternate pairs of horizontal rows being oriented oppositely to those of the pairs of rows between them.

This arrangement of cores and windings requires that all column drivers apply current to the plane in the same direction, but that some row drivers apply currents in one direction and others in the opposite direction. Current directions for writing are shown by the arrows at the left and top of the plane. Current directions for reading are, of course, opposite to those shown.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 2 pictures or other non-text objects]