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Heat Sink Attach to Electronic Packages for Small-Sized Heat Sinks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099067D
Publication Date: 2005-Mar-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 91K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that uses a metal motherboard anchor and a plastic preload plug pin to attach a small-sized heat sink to the package. Benefits include reducing creep during environmental testing, and protecting the solder ball interface from shock.

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Heat Sink Attach to Electronic Packages for Small-Sized Heat Sinks

Disclosed is a method that uses a metal motherboard anchor and a plastic preload plug pin to attach a small-sized heat sink to the package. Benefits include reducing creep during environmental testing, and protecting the solder ball interface from shock.

Background

Currently, the most common attaches for chipset component heat sinks are a z-clip and a wave solder heat sink. The wave solder process fails environmental testing due to the creep of the straight pins (which are required for the wave solder solution). In addition, the preload from the wave solder process is an end result of the manufacturing process and can not be changed. Changes in thickness of the thermal interface material reduces the preload of the wave solder solution, and when combined with creep, causes visible air gaps between the electrical component and the heat sink. 

General Description

The disclosed method is comprised of two components:

1.      A metal motherboard anchor made of board mount pins, each with a bent angle at the bottom pin end and a rectangular sheath with barbs protruding inwards on the top end (see Figure 1).

2.      A plastic preload plug pin (see Figure 2) made of a solid pin that engages the barbs on the metal anchor and bottoms out on the motherboard. It has a top surface to allow for a downward installation force, members that create a preload at the heat sink-to-electrical component interface, and a solid z-stop for the heat sink (see Figure 3). 

This two-piece connection is made a...