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Browse Prior Art Database

Laser/Collimator Alignment Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099196D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 107K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Latta, MR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for quickly sensing the of a diode laser with respect to a collimator in all six degrees of freedom.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Laser/Collimator Alignment Method

       Disclosed is a method for quickly sensing the of a diode
laser with respect to a collimator in all six degrees of freedom.

      Production of a laser/collimator subassembly includes steps
sensing the position of the laser with respect to the moving the
laser to the proper position, then the two together.  To achieve
adequate it is generally necessary to measure the of the beam of
light rather than depend on reference surfaces because of the
sensitivity to small displacements - typically sub-micron.

      The conventional ways to measure light beam quality,
interferometers connected to computers, are accurate slow, and do not
necessarily provide information for all degrees of freedom.  The
system described herein information for alignment in all six axes
very  Proper collimation implies that the output beam of is parallel
to and centered on the optical axis, and in size within the limits
dictated by diffraction.

      Fig. 1 shows a properly aligned assembly in the system: light
from the laser is centered and distributed on both detectors.

      Figs. 2A-2C illustrate the effects of transverse, and angular
misalignment.  The coordinate convention is as follows:  Z is the
(ideal) optical X and Y are normal to Z and each other; Theta X,
Theta and Theta Z are rotations about the X, Y, and Z axes,
Longitudinal displacement causes the beam to a different size on one
detector compared to the other; displacement causes the beam to be
decentered by amounts on the two detectors; and angular causes t...