Browse Prior Art Database

Publishing Documents Based On Word Processing Markup

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099351D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 101K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bolan, RJ: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

A method is described to overcome the limitations implicit in documents marked up with specific layout markup. It is used to provide a system where a word processor is used by authors for ease of use and a specialist uses a sophisticated publishing system to automatically provide the functionality that is not available on the word processor in the document. This method also provides a significant level of bidirectional interchange between different product families without loss of information.

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Publishing Documents Based On Word Processing Markup

       A method is described to overcome the limitations implicit
in documents marked up with specific layout markup.  It is used to
provide a system where a word processor is used by authors for ease
of use and a specialist uses a sophisticated publishing system to
automatically provide the functionality that is not available on the
word processor in the document.  This method also provides a
significant level of bidirectional interchange between different
product families without loss of information.

      In general, word processing systems format text that is
intermixed with specific layout instructions.  For example, a user
could make a block of text look like a paragraph by placing a blank
line before and after the block. Alternatively, a user could make a
block of text look like a paragraph by indenting the first line of
each block some number of spaces.

                            (Image Omitted)

      In sophisticated publishing systems the concept of generalized
or logical markup has been introduced.  Logical markup allows the
user to "tag" various blocks of text as being a paragraph, a heading,
or a list item.  In this way an element is identified by what it is,
rather than how it looks.  The formatter is then instructed how to
format each logical element by a formatting profile and macro
library.

      What is unique about the method described here is that
generalized tags are used to represent layout rather than logical
markup.  The method is based on a syntax converter that changes
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