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Browse Prior Art Database

Generic Robotic Cell for Component Insertion

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099386D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-14
Document File: 5 page(s) / 220K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aronoff III, R: AUTHOR [+9]

Abstract

This article describes the GRC (Generic Robotic Cell) that is designed to insert components of various form factors (SIPs, DIPs, and IBM modules) into printed circuit cards from industry-standard tubes. In addition, it tests SIPs functionally prior to insertion and verifies modules and DIPs prior to insertion. It has four main subsystems.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 28% of the total text.

Generic Robotic Cell for Component Insertion

       This article describes the GRC (Generic Robotic Cell) that
is designed to insert components of various form factors (SIPs, DIPs,
and IBM modules) into printed circuit cards from industry-standard
tubes.  In addition, it tests SIPs functionally prior to insertion
and verifies modules and DIPs prior to insertion.  It has four main
subsystems.

      A GRC may be rapidly reconfigured (ten minutes or less) to
insert DIP, SIP, or MOD-type components at any time, allowing dynamic
compensation for "bubbles" in the production schedule.  This ability
yields a highly flexible line able to cope with randomly changing
demand at minimum capital expenditure.  The line further benefits
from the flexibility of the GRCs in decreased sensitivity to machine
failure, allowing less redundancy of tools.
    The GRC has four main subsystems:
    Feeder subsystem
    Clinch subsystem
    Robot subsystem
    Test subsystem
    The clinch subsystem, the feeder subsystem and the robot
subsystem all have quick release tool adapters that allow rapid
swapping of tooling "heads".  To change the GRC to insert DIPs, for
instance, the DIP clinch is placed on the clinch tool adapter, the
DIP picker is placed on the feeder tool adapter, and the DIP
end-effector is placed on the robot.

      In actual operation, each subsystem has its own controller.
The runmonitor computer controls the feeder subsystem and is the
master computer in the system.  The robot controller runs as a slave
to the runmonitor computer. The test subsystem runs as a slave to the
runmonitor computer.  The clinch subsystem runs as a slave to the
robot controller.  Each of the controllers runs asynchronously from
the others during the component-insertion process to maximize system
throughput.  Synchronization is controlled by inter-system
communication, generally via parallel DI/DO ports.

      The robot on the GRC has a compliant end-effector that senses a
proper insertion.  The robot attempts several times to properly
insert a part and discards it if it is not successful.  The robot is
given a new part to try inserting, and the process repeats.
    The GRC has several unique features:
    Overlapped operations for improved speed
    Runmonitor control program
    Separation of many different defect types
    Intelligent operator safety interlock
    Alternate registration block OVERLAPPED OPERATIONS FOR IMPROVED
SPEED

      Each subsystem on the GRC has its own controller.  The feeder
subsystem is controlled by an IBM 7532 computer running the
runmonitor program.  The runmonitor program synchronizes the other
control systems, as necessary.  The robot controller controls the
robot subsystem.  The test subsystem is controlled by another IBM
7532 computer running the test program.  The clinch subsystem is
controlled by a vendor stepper motor control system.  Each of the
controllers r...