Browse Prior Art Database

Signature "Verification" On Checks And Other Paper Media

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099411D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 110K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Denoix, B: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method which facilitates signature verification on checks and other paper media. The original document contains a signature hidden under "silver-rubber ink", and not until a person has signed his name is this hidden signature revealed to the interested party.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Signature "Verification" On Checks And Other Paper Media

       Disclosed is a method which facilitates signature
verification on checks and other paper media.  The original document
contains a signature hidden under "silver-rubber ink", and not until
a person has signed his name is this hidden signature revealed to the
interested party.

      As background, note that a major problem with travellers checks
is that a person can forge a signature since the check-owner has
already signed the travellers check a first time when received.  This
article suggests that the signature be first placed under an "ink".
When the check is cashed, the payee can scratch this off to see if
the signatures match, and reject all checks which are already
scratched.  This method works best when only one travellers check is
carried by the user.

      The first signature is scanned and then printed on the
subsequent checks by a terminal.  The same terminal would then
overprint all the signatures with silver or gold rubber ink.  This
would eliminate the drudgery of manually signing dozens of checks.

      To enhance the protection given by this concept, the scanned
original signature can be scrambled, and printed on the check, along
with some information allowing unscrambling.  The payee has another
device which scans the scrambling data and scrambled signature, and
unscrambles it and displays the result for comparison.  Therefore,
the criminal cannot simply look at a "signature" under the foil of
another check and know how he should write the name.

      To make this system more foolproof, three hidden signature are
placed on the check or document.  Only one of the three are written
by the owner of the check.  The owner knows which of the three is
correct.  A code, only known to travellers checks payees, could be
used so that the payee would also know which signature is correct.
Possibly, it could be encoded secretly into the numbers on the check,
or be sent out as a list by the issuer of the travellers checks from
time to time.  One other option is to have special ink over the
appropriate signature that requires a secret chemical to show up.

      Specific information on how the disclosed checks are printed is
now given.  The device descri...