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Browse Prior Art Database

Problem-Specific Sample Carriers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099431D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gimzewski, JK: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The general sample carrier consists of two parts 1 and 2 made from stainless-steel or copper. It is sketched in Fig. 1. The samples are attached to the carrier according to the specific aims and physical restrictions. Two sets of holes 3 and 4 enable fork-type tools in vacuo to pull the carrier from its holder and bring it to different places for sample cleaning and/or characterization or to insert it from atmosphere into vacuum. The two parts 1 and 2 are kept together by screws 5 and electrically isolated by the ceramic washers 6. The electrical isolation of the two parts allows to draw a current of several amperes through the sample which is fastened to the carrier by thin tantalum wires which act like legs of a table representing the sample. The wires become hot and heat the sample.

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Problem-Specific Sample Carriers

       The general sample carrier consists of two parts 1 and 2
made from stainless-steel or copper.  It is sketched in Fig. 1.  The
samples are attached to the carrier according to the specific aims
and physical restrictions.  Two sets of holes 3 and 4 enable
fork-type tools in vacuo to pull the carrier from its holder and
bring it to different places for sample cleaning and/or
characterization or to insert it from atmosphere into vacuum.  The
two parts 1 and 2 are kept together by screws 5 and electrically
isolated by the ceramic washers 6.  The electrical isolation of the
two parts allows to draw a current of several amperes through the
sample which is fastened to the carrier by thin tantalum wires which
act like legs of a table representing the sample.  The wires become
hot and heat the sample.  The maximum temperature reached is N 1500
degrees C. Semiconductor wafers of metallic samples are best suited
for this purpose.  Cooling through the wires is less efficient, but N
100 K have been obtained.

      Even higher temperatures can be reached if a filament is
mounted below the sample which is then biased to high voltage.  With
the electron bombardment performed in this way, temperatures up to
2500 degrees C may be reached.

      Another use of the general carrier is as evaporation source.  A
filament or a basket made from tantalum foil contains the material to
be evaporated and is heated by drawing a current through the carrier.
 Also getter-type ovens, Knudsen cells and sublimation ovens fit this
carrier. STM carrier

      A sample attachment via wires as described above does not have
the stability required in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM).
Therefore, a rigid mount of the sample...