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Low Temperature Selective Epitaxial Growth of Silicon at Atmospheric Pressure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099443D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-14
Document File: 2 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berkenblit, M: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for growing epitaxial silicon selectively on oxide patterned substrates from 850oC down to 600oC. This was accomplished for the first time in the Si-Cl-H system at atmospheric pressure. Previous work had shown that epitaxy grown at very low temperatures could only be achieved at low pressures (1,2,3,4).

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Low Temperature Selective Epitaxial Growth of Silicon at Atmospheric Pressure

       Disclosed is a process for growing epitaxial silicon
selectively on oxide patterned substrates from 850oC down to 600oC.
This was accomplished for the first time in the Si-Cl-H system at
atmospheric pressure.  Previous work had shown that epitaxy grown at
very low temperatures could only be achieved at low pressures
(1,2,3,4).

      Si deposition was achieved by hydrogen reduction of
dichlorosilane (DCS) in an ultra-clean system using a load lock.
Epitaxy was achieved at low temperatures only when the hydrogen was
purified to remove traces of water and oxygen, implying that an
oxygen-free environment is the most important factor controlling
epitaxy at the temperature.

      Si deposition was carried out in a flow system at 600-850oC at
a pressure slightly above one atmosphere using the hydrogen reduction
of DCS.  The deposition reactor was a horizontally arranged,
thermally floating quartz tube fitted with a SiC-coated graphite
susceptor heated by an external tungsten lamp array.  Substrates were
loaded into the reaction chamber via a load lock, and in practice the
reaction chamber was not exposed to room atmosphere for periods of
weeks.  To achieve a high level of cleanliness, the gas lines were
welded or VCR-connected electropolished stainless steel tubing.
These lines were heated and purged in between deposition experiments
with boil-off liquid argon.  The DCS was Ultraplus grade (Linde) in a
seamless, electropolished stainless steel cylinder. The hydrogen was
99.999% or 99.9999% pure and was purified by passing it through a
Nanochem hydrogen purifier (Semigas Systems).  The water content at
the reactor output was continuously monitored by an Aquamatic Plus
moisture monitor (Meeco).

      The substrates were RCA cleaned just prior to use, dipped 10
seconds in 0.5% HF, placed in the load lock for 10 minutes in argon,
transfered into the...