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Browse Prior Art Database

Loading Servo/Clock Heads Onto a Disk Surface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099455D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-14
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cunningham, GA: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Production methods are described that facilitate the insertion of magnetic read/write heads for servo or clock pulses between stacked disk surfaces with narrow interdisk clearances allowing loading of heads in a gentle manner under machine sensing and control. Instead of complex head load assemblies inserting heads at stepped heights between disks and then loading from an uncontrolled distance onto the disk surface, this method holds the head at one nominal level and the disk pack is raised or lowered under control of position and head load sensors to suit the selected disk surface.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Loading Servo/Clock Heads Onto a Disk Surface

       Production methods are described that facilitate the
insertion of magnetic read/write heads for servo or clock pulses
between stacked disk surfaces with narrow interdisk clearances
allowing loading of heads in a gentle manner under machine sensing
and control.  Instead of complex head load assemblies inserting heads
at stepped heights between disks and then loading from an
uncontrolled distance onto the disk surface, this method holds the
head at one nominal level and the disk pack is raised or lowered
under control of position and head load sensors to suit the selected
disk surface.

      The method avoids the need of a complex load/unload system for
heads.  Reducing the moving mass of a head-move system eliminates
mechanical resonance problems.  Low-speed head loading reduces the
risk of head and disk damage compared to previous systems.  It is
suitable for small disk spacings.  A head retaining bar can move
between disks when the head is moved in 'x' direction after the head
has been loaded.  Previous head load systems are too large to go
between disks with 3.5 mm spacing.  Absolute positioning of disk
relative to servo head need not be performed accurately and
mechanical tolerances within the head disk assembly do not affect the
head suspension angle when the head is loaded.  With no moving parts
and self-calibrating, time-consuming set-up procedures and costly
calibration tooling are avoided.

      The figure shows the general arrangement of a jacking table 1
supporting a disk file pack 2 with vertical movement 'y...