Browse Prior Art Database

Application Configuration Control Through the Use of Shared Memory

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099573D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 4 page(s) / 126K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chapman, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a program that provides both the flexibility to develop products consistent with IBM System Application Architecture (SAA) considerations and the ability to tailor application controls to accommodate varying environments and audiences while keeping end-user interfaces consistent across applications. Application Configuration Control centralizes application resources and provides a set of panels though which users manipulate a centralized area of memory that controls the applications. This centralized approach also eases the tasks involved with National Language Support (NLS) translation as well as SAA Common User Access (CUA) compliance.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 45% of the total text.

Application Configuration Control Through the Use of Shared Memory

       Disclosed is a program that provides both the flexibility
to develop products consistent with IBM System Application
Architecture (SAA) considerations and the ability to tailor
application controls to accommodate varying environments and
audiences while keeping end-user interfaces consistent across
applications.  Application Configuration Control centralizes
application resources and provides a set of panels though which users
manipulate a centralized area of memory that controls the
applications.  This centralized approach also eases the tasks
involved with National Language Support (NLS) translation as well as
SAA Common User Access (CUA) compliance.

      Resource sharing is accomplished through a central control
block allocated in memory which contains data that is used by
multiple applications.  The control block is allocated as "Shared
Memory" and initialized with user-defined data residing in a
configuration file on disk. Shared Memory, as implemented in OS/2*,
allows several applications to access the same system memory
concurrently. Each application must access this Shared Memory area to
reference global and/or customizable data.

      Allocation and initialization of this unique shared memory area
takes place upon invocation of the first application requiring access
to it.  This involves reading the configuration file into Shared
Memory.  Once initialized, each application references data from this
area.

      The result of placing data referenced by several applications
in shared memory is that applications need not define data in their
local data segment.  This reduces the data segment size necessary for
static variables and provides a larger heap area per application.
This also eliminates the need for redundant data definition across
applications.

      The Shared Memory area contains two types of data: data shared
by all applications (providing for resource sharing), and data
specific to each application (allowing for application customization
and control).

      All application panel text is referenced from Shared Memory.
By referencing text and other shared data directly from this area of
shared memory, the data is assured to remain consistent across
applications.  By combining all text into this central area, NLS
translation and textual customization is transparent to the
application.

      Each application has an area reserved for variable definitions
unique to the application.  Because each application has different
requirements, application areas will vary in size.  Unlike the text
structure, these areas are not accessed by other applications, but
are defined to allow users to customize the individual application
fields through the customization panels.  Each field in such an area
has an entry field in a customization panel through which the user
configures the application.  The applications reference th...