Browse Prior Art Database

Iconic Calendar

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099623D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 98K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jensen, JR: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a way to use graphical icons to capture information into a calendar. Emphasis is placed on the ease-of-use aspect in an attempt at trying to capture information about events that do not get entered into the calendars today.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Iconic Calendar

       This article describes a way to use graphical icons to
capture information into a calendar.  Emphasis is placed on the
ease-of-use aspect in an attempt at trying to capture information
about events that do not get entered into the calendars today.

      Electronic calendars serves at least two purposes. First,
scheduling the use of the hours of a given day, to ensure that the
activities get done. Secondly, they are often used to inform other
people of where you are and when you will be back.  This second use
will be the focus in this article.  Its usefulness is directly
proportional to its accuracy, so it becomes important to capture
information about as many of the day's events and activities as
possible, as accurately as possible.  Today, however, only the major
or longer- lasting events get reported. Activities of shorter
duration are often left unmentioned, either because they occur
spontaneously, or because the inconvenience (or cost) of capturing
them is seen to outweigh the benefits.  As a result, a receptionist
often cannot answer questions such as "Where is he now?"  or "When
will he be back?", but is forced to reply somewhat like: "He is away
from his desk" -- an answer neither informative nor very useful.

                            (Image Omitted)

      A way to address this problem is to make it easy to capture the
information about one's activities and whereabouts.  This can be done
by using the power of the graphical user interface.  First generate a
set of icons. Each icon represents a commonly occurring event, and
should depict this in an easily recognizable form.  Some examples may
be: Then place these icons on the display, so they are readily
accessible at all times.  Their specific position on the display is
not important, and can be left to the user's discretion.  One
possibility is to place them along the right border, aligned
vertically, but this is by no means the only possible placement.

      All the user now needs to do to update his calendar when he
leaves this office is "touch" the appropriate icon. This can be done
in any number of ways that is supported by the actual hardware in
place, be it by keyboard usage, mouse point-and-select, or, best of
all, by us...