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Conversion of Modified Avp Format Into Assembly Code

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099642D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 86K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mickelson, KB: AUTHOR

Abstract

Discussed is a method to convert Architectural Verifi- cation Programs to assembly code. The Architectural Verification Program (AVP) format test cases are created with "R" cards for register setup and test. (See the preceding article.) These allow a control program to directly interface with simulated facilities. When tests are run with facilities that cannot be altered directly, those "R" cards must be converted into assembly code to accomplish the intent of the card.

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Conversion of Modified Avp Format Into Assembly Code

       Discussed is a method to convert Architectural Verifi-
cation Programs to assembly code.  The Architectural Verification
Program (AVP) format test cases are created with "R" cards for
register setup and test.  (See the preceding article.) These allow a
control program to directly interface with simulated facilities. When
tests are run with facilities that cannot be altered directly, those
"R" cards must be converted into assembly code to accomplish the
intent of the card.

      The result of the conversion is an assembly program that can be
input to the machine assembler and then bound to create object code
that can be loaded into the CPU memory space.  The converted code for
the test cards includes a few registers that track the test in
process.  The idea is that once the control program finds an error in
a result card, the program should terminate while, at the same time,
providing a return code in a predefined register that provides
information about the test that failed.  There are several important
parts involved in this conversion process. The process requires:
     1.  Register name cross-reference table.
     2.  Prepared list of EQUATES to define register address offsets.
     3. Prepared list of declared constants defining base addresses,
and constants used in the conversion code. The major effort involves
the creation of the register cross- reference table.  Each entry of
the table involves the following data:
      1.  Register Name (as would appear on an R card).
      2.  Base address for register (if in I/O space).
      3.  Offset from base address required to access register
(required only on some).
      4.  Segment register content to be used.
      5.  Action code.

      Registers are broken down into categories which are defined by
the assembly code steps required to replace the "R" card.  The
conversion program uses the contents of the "R" card plus the action
code to determine what sequence of instructions to create.  For each
type of card, a different sequence is generated depending on whether
the card is a setup card or a test car...