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Audio-Visual Reproduction of Reality

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099677D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 102K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kalendra, DJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

A technique is described whereby visual and audio recording and playback mechanisms are designed in such a way so as to provide the effects of realism. Stereoscopy/stereophonic reproduction and playback synchronization techniques, along with the coordination and superimposing of lenses to provide the stimulus of realism, are described.

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Audio-Visual Reproduction of Reality

       A technique is described whereby visual and audio
recording and playback mechanisms are designed in such a way so as to
provide the effects of realism.  Stereoscopy/stereophonic
reproduction and playback synchronization techniques, along with the
coordination and superimposing of lenses to provide the stimulus of
realism, are described.

      Typically, visual realism occurs when individuals experience
both three dimensional (3D) and two dimensional (2D).  This produces
"circular vision", where the field of view is based on a curved
wide-angle plane.  Generally, prior art reproduction techniques
utilize "flat vision" realism, based on a flat plane.  The 3D visual
effect occurs only where the right and left images coincide, as shown
in Fig. 1.  The remaining image sections, at the right and left
sides, are seen by each respective eye in 2D only, and is commonly
referred to as human peripheral vision.

      When the brain focuses together the two independent right and
left circular images so that they coincide, the result is a perceived
illusion of three dimensions.  The remaining parts of the images are
seen in 2D only.  The images superimposed on each retina are not
perfect circles, since there are obstructions, such as the nose,
cheeks, shape of the eye sockets, etc., which causes each person to
see a slightly different view.  However, when devices, such as the
"fisheye" lenses with their large angle of view are incorporated, the
various obstructions do not come into play.

      The concept described herein obtains the realism based
primarily on present day photographic film and lens technology, where
the right and left view of objects are superimposed on two film
planes, as shown in Fig. 2.  The implementation of "fisheye" lenses
are important elements in the technique...