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Improved Wear Surface for Linear Print Actuator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099781D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sitton, WW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a means for reducing stator surface wear, in a magnetically operated linear print actuator, by overlaying the stator surfaces with a thin plate of a high strength non-magnetic material.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 70% of the total text.

Improved Wear Surface for Linear Print Actuator

       Disclosed is a means for reducing stator surface wear, in
a magnetically operated linear print actuator, by overlaying the
stator surfaces with a thin plate of a high strength non-magnetic
material.

      The figure shows a known linear actuator printer in which a dot
is printed by the motion of Slider 1, which passes between the two
pairs of opposing pole faces of Stators 2.  Stator assembly
fabrication includes injection molded plastic material 3 between the
poles.  Slider 1 is composed of Magnetic Segments 4, and Non-magnetic
Segments 5.  When at rest, Non-magnetic Segments 5 are between the
poles of Stators 2.  When the Stators are energized, the magnetic
field causes Slider 1 to move to the left to align Magnetic Segments
4 with the pole faces of Stators 2. When Stators 2 are deenergized,
Slider 1 is returned to its at-rest position by a spring (not shown).

      It is evident that there must be some inherent degree of
friction between oscillating Slider 1 and the surfaces of Stators 2.
It is also apparent that the magnetic field created by the Stators
generates not only a force to move the Slider forward, but also
lateral forces which substantially increase the frictional force
between the Slider and the Stator surfaces.  The wear surfaces of the
Stators consist of two materials, soft magnetic iron and
injection-molded plastic, neither of which is a particularly good
bearing material.  Further...