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Method for Automatic Analysis of Meter in (both) Poetry And Prose

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099818D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 85K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cohen, PS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Hand analysis of meter in prose and poetry, though useful for producing good writing, is time-consuming and tedious. The method described below accomplishes this task automatically.

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Method for Automatic Analysis of Meter in (both) Poetry And Prose

       Hand analysis of meter in prose and poetry, though useful
for producing good writing, is time-consuming and tedious. The method
described below accomplishes this task automatically.

      Description of the Invention "Proof", "Critique" and similar
products and tools have made it possible to check spelling and
hyphenation, and to analyze syntax.  The results are then displayed
perspicuously on a video display terminal.

      With the availability of on-line dictionaries and automatic
pattern-matching algorithms, it becomes possible to analyze and
display in a similar fashion the stress (or accentual) pattern of
pieces of prose and poetry.  This process can be automated as
follows:

      The accentual information for base forms of words is stored in
the pronunciation records of the on-line dictionary. Existing
morphological analyzers can be employed to supplement this
information when forms having prefixes and suffixes are encountered.

      For forms neither found nor constructible by the addition of
prefixes and suffixes (proper names, trade names, etc.), stress
patterns can be generated by rule and these may optionally be
verified through interaction with the user.

      Syntactic analysis provides the necessary phrase, clause, and
sentence boundary information.

      Finally, standard pattern-matching techniques are used to find
repetitive sequences and to highlight and appropriately align them.
It should be noted that with the substitution of the appropriate
grammars, dictionaries, etc., the same method can be applied for
works in languages other than English.

      Possible Applications

      For prose, particularly prose intended to be read aloud (such
as speeches or news reports...