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Byte Alignment of Data Transfer Via Byte Addressed Temporary Storage

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099843D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McCool, MA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Rather than treating byte alignment and data buffering as two separate requirements, it is best to design the interface between two systems with both solutions in mind.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 76% of the total text.

Byte Alignment of Data Transfer Via Byte Addressed Temporary Storage

       Rather than treating byte alignment and data buffering as
two separate requirements, it is best to design the interface between
two systems with both solutions in mind.

      By using storage elements which are the same width as the
smallest addressable unit of memory between the two systems involved,
combining these elements to match the common data path width, and
properly controlling the unique addressing to those independent
elements, data buffering and data alignment can be solved in one
design.  In that way, a separate level of temporary storage for byte
alignment can be eliminated.

      The data flow diagram shows the primary elements of the logic
used to automatically byte-align data into the transfer buffer
without any additional storage elements. The A/B multiplexers (MUXs)
serve to provide bidirectional data transfer between System A memory
and System B memory. The memory will arbitrarily be referred to in
this example as 'source' and 'destination'.  The HI/LO multiplexers
to swap the high and low bytes and the separate address control for
each byte-wide buffer are integral parts of the alignment technique.

      The basic concept is that the data from the source location is
brought into the data buffers through the preceding multiplexers and
stored in a format which is directly transferable to the destination.
 For those cases where alignment is necessary, the dat...