Browse Prior Art Database

Computer-In-An-Armchair

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099863D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 111K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McLean, JG: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes an armchair with a personal computer (PC) incorporated directly into the chair. The armchair can be mounted on wheels to comprise a wheelchair.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Computer-In-An-Armchair

       This article describes an armchair with a personal
computer (PC) incorporated directly into the chair.  The armchair can
be mounted on wheels to comprise a wheelchair.

      PCs have made life easier for many handicapped individuals.
PCs can aid in communication, education, and productivity for persons
with various types of disabilities. However, these benefits can be
lost once the person leaves his computer room.  An armchair-based PC
is disclosed herein which allows severely handicapped individuals to
have PC assistance available at all times.  A liquid crystal display
(LCD) and/or a tablet folds away into the armrests in a manner
similar to some airline seat tray-tables.  The existing power supply
on a motorized wheelchair can be modified to run the computer as
well.  The computer can be interfaced to the motor control circuitry,
and software can cause the chair to perform simple or complex
maneuvers at the touch of a key.  The PC can control a voice
synthesizer, useful for some wheelchair-bound people.

      The PC planar board (primary circuit board) is located under
the seat in a protective box (above the motor assembly in a motorized
chair).  The PC bus, keyboard cable, and display cable run through
the tubular frame of the chair for easy access at multiple locations.
 The chair allows a user to easily use a computer while sitting
comfortably without the need for added work tables and peripheral
work stands. The equipment is protected from sight and from the
environment when not in use.  This chair also can be equipped with
wheels for use by the handicapped.

      The drawing shows an armchair 1 with computer peripherals
incorporated into its structure, and simple structure for making
these peripherals readily available to the user.  The PC main unit 2
is placed in a cavity 3 underneath the seat.  A cover 4 protects the
unit from the environment.  All cabling between the units runs
through appropriate channels inside of the chair.

      Two 3.5-inch disk drives 5 and, optionally, a 3.5-inch hard
disk drive, pop out of the disk drive cavity 6 in the right arm of
the chair.  A spring 7 inside of the cavity enables the drives to
move up and down.  The unit is snapped into place when in the up
position, and it is easily available to the user.  The top drive unit
serves as the lid when in the down position.

      Keyboard 8 is shown in the open pos...