Browse Prior Art Database

Electronic Due Dates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099875D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 114K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Vincent, JP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Consider a computer electronic mail system which allows one user to send a file (note, letter, document, or other computer file) to one or more other users connected either to the same computer system or, via telecommunications, to another computer system. Consider also a computer calendar system available to the same users, which calendar system supports tentative and confirmed calendar events and messages triggered by expiration of a set date and time.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Electronic Due Dates

       Consider a computer electronic mail system which allows
one user to send a file (note, letter, document, or other computer
file) to one or more other users connected either to the same
computer system or, via telecommunications, to another computer
system.  Consider also a computer calendar system available to the
same users, which calendar system supports tentative and confirmed
calendar events and messages triggered by expiration of a set date
and time.

      In such a composite mail and calendar system, a method is
proposed for the management of document due dates.

      Consider the following scenario.  User 1 sends a note,
document, memo, letter, or other correspondence file to another user
with a requested due date.  The receiving user, User 2, accepts the
due date.  In the proposed method, when User 1 sends the document,
the requested due date is recorded on User 1's calendar as the
tentative trigger event to expire on or before the requested due
date.  When User 2 accepts the due date, two processes occur: 1) the
due date is recorded on User 2's calendar as a confirmed trigger
event to expire on or before the requested due date, and 2) an
acknowledgement is sent to User 1 indicating that the due date is
accepted.  When User 1 receives the acknowledgement, User 1's
calendar event is changed from tentative to confirmed.

      Consider the following second scenario: User 1 sends User 2 a
correspondence with a due date.  When User 2 reads the
correspondence, he or she finds the due date unacceptable and changes
the date to one he or she can commit to meet.  In this case, the
following occur: 1) the requested due date is recorded on User 1's
calendar as tentative, at the time the correspondence is sent, 2)
when User 2 changes the due date, the new date is recorded on User
2's calendar as a tentative event, and 3) the acknowledgement sent to
User 1 indicates the changed due date.  4) When User 1 sees the
acknowledgement with a new proposed due date, the original due date
event is deleted from the calendar.  5) If User 1 accepts the new
date, the new date is written as a confirmed event, and an
acknowledgement (of acceptance) is sent to User 2.  6)  When user 2
sees this acknowledgement, the event for the new agreed-to due date
is changed to confirmed.

      In this way, a proposed date is carried as tentative until
accepted by the recipient of the requested date.  When a date is
accepted, the acknowledgment will change this event to confirmed.
When a new date is counter-offered, the date is written as tentative,
until accepted by the original user.  In this way, offered dates are
carried and seen as tentative, and mutually accepted dates are
confirmed.  The mail acknowledgement notice is used as the medium for
exchanging these offered dates, and for signaling the acceptance of
the agreed-to date.

      The recommended implementation of the method takes these steps:
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