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Browse Prior Art Database

Due Dates As Tentative Calendar Trigger

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099901D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 1 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Vincent, JP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Consider a computer electronic mail system which allows one user to send a file (note, letter, document, or other computer file) to one or more other users connected either to the same computer system or, via telecommunications, to another computer system. Current art allows the entry of a due date for the document which is seen by each recipient when the electronic mail is opened and the new mail is shown.

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Due Dates As Tentative Calendar Trigger

       Consider a computer electronic mail system which allows
one user to send a file (note, letter, document, or other computer
file) to one or more other users connected either to the same
computer system or, via telecommunications, to another computer
system.  Current art allows the entry of a due date for the document
which is seen by each recipient when the electronic mail is opened
and the new mail is shown.

      The proposed method provides for linking this requested due
date function of mail to the sending user's calendar system as a
trigger event where the date and time of the trigger event is set
from the requested due date and the text of the triggered message is
composed from the name of the recipient, the date sent, the due date
requested, and the subject of the mailed item.  In current art,
calendar trigger systems can be set to send the triggered message a
set or variable number of minutes or hours before the actual event
time and date.  In the recommended implementation, the due date
trigger event would expire one or more days before the actual due
date requested so that an appropriate follow-up can occur.  The
recommended implementation takes these steps:
      1.   When a item is mailed to another, the date, subject, and
name of the user to whom the item is sent is recorded in the sender's
calendar system.
      2.   Based on a previously specified "lead time", or at the
instance of send...