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IBM OS/2 Extended Edition Configuration

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099913D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 6 page(s) / 238K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Copenhaver, DB: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This disclosure describes the method that the OS/2* Extended Edition (EE) Database Manager uses to allow users to fine tune a database system.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 25% of the total text.

IBM OS/2 Extended Edition Configuration

       This disclosure describes the method that the OS/2*
Extended Edition (EE) Database Manager uses to allow users to fine
tune a database system.

      There needs to be a way for the user to fine tune system
resources and performance criteria at the system and database level,
at the same time provide ease of use and validity checking.  The
purpose of the OS/2 EE Database Manager Configuration is to manage
the configuration files and the information in these files.  The
purpose of this article is to describe how the above is accomplished
and what problems have been prevented.

      The OS/2 EE Database Manager System has two types of
configuration files: kernel and database.  The kernel configuration
file parameters define the OS/2 EE Database Manager kernel, and only
one kernel configuration file exists per workstation.  The database
configuration file parameters define characteristics of the database
running against the OS/2 EE Database Manager kernel.  These
parameters can effect the performance of the database.  One database
configuration file exists for each database created.

      There are 9 interfaces to the OS/2 EE Database Manager
Configuration.
1.   Internal Return a copy of the kernel configuration file
2.   Internal Return a copy of the  database configuration
     file
3.   External Reset the kernel configuration file
4.   External Reset the database configuration file
5.   Update the kernel configuration file
6.   Internal Update of the database configuration file
7.   External Update of the database configuration file
8.   External Return a copy of the kernel configuration file
9.   External Return a copy of the  database configuration
      file

      These interfaces are divided into 2 categories: a) those
interfaces defined as OS/2 EE Database Manager API, and b)
interfaced internal to OS/2 EE Database Manager.

      There are also 3 types of validation for the configuration
files.  Type 1 is simply a verification of a valid checksum.  Type 2
is a validation of a checksum plus a compatibility check between the
database configuration file and the kernel configuration file.  Type
3 validates that the individual entries are within minimum and
maximum boundaries, and also does a compatibility check between the
database configuration file and the kernel configuration file.  More
detail on when which type is used will be provided with the detailed
description of the interfaces.

      The configuration files may be changed at any time, but the
changes are not effective immediately.  The changes made to the
kernel configuration file are activated at the next STARTDBM.  The
changes to the database configuration file are only activated by the
OS/2 EE Database Manager when the database goes from inactive to
active. That is, update is not activated until all applications have
issued a Stop Using Database and then one...