Browse Prior Art Database

Drawing Pen for Free Space Cursor/Pointer Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099937D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 88K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gunn, WA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a device resembling a pen designed to operate in conjunction with a free space cursor/pointer movement device. The pen device can be used on any flat surface to draw objects or write signatures. What one sees on the drawing surface is what is displayed on the screen.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Drawing Pen for Free Space Cursor/Pointer Devices

       Disclosed is a device resembling a pen designed to
operate in conjunction with a free space cursor/pointer movement
device.  The pen device can be used on any flat surface to draw
objects or write signatures.  What one sees on the drawing surface is
what is displayed on the screen.

      Current drawing devices limit the user's ability to sign
documents and draw objects partly because the devices, such as a
mouse, are cumbersome and also because, in many cases, the user
feedback (output) appears on the display and not on the surface on
which he is working.

      Drawing tasks require fine movements using a device that often
cannot produce the required precision.  For example, providing a
legible, recognizable, signature which can be reliably detected by a
pattern recognition software engine would be one example.

      In addition to the hardware component, a software routine
usually analyzes the probability of the signature being accurate
within default parameters or some confidence level.  Also, security
is "built in" because an exact signature pattern, presented
repeatedly, would mean that the user had stored the signature in a
file.  This approach would allow control of the signature by access
protection software, such as IBM's RACF.

      Alternatively, actively creating a signature object for certain
other transmitted objects (e.g., electronic funds transfer) could be
a system requirement.  The object could not be edited nor saved as a
separate file.  Further, copying a signed document would either
trigger access protection software or cause an automatic signature
erasure. Signature protection should be flexible to accommodate audit
procedures of corporate users and permit users to easily comply with
GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) developed for
automated accounting/financial systems.

      A p...