Browse Prior Art Database

Nitrogen-Cooled Central Electronic Complex

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099939D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carlson, HA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a computer system configuration which takes advantage of operating CMOS devices at low temperature. It enables close coupling between a processing unit and main memory to enhance system performance and yet does not require the memory to be cooled to the same temperatures as the processor, maintaining system efficiency and yet allowing a degree of enhanced memory performance.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 68% of the total text.

Nitrogen-Cooled Central Electronic Complex

       Disclosed is a computer system configuration which takes
advantage of operating CMOS devices at low temperature.  It enables
close coupling between a processing unit and main memory to enhance
system performance and yet does not require the memory to be cooled
to the same temperatures as the processor, maintaining system
efficiency and yet allowing a degree of enhanced memory performance.

      The figure shows a CMOS processing unit immersed in liquid
nitrogen in a cryogenic container.  The performance of the processing
unit is increased by approximately a factor of two by operating in
this environment.  As power dissipation boils the nitrogen, it is
recondensed by the second stage cold head of the cryocooler.
Dual-stage cryocoolers are commercially available products.  The
theoretical (Carnot) efficiency of this stage of cooling is
77/(300-77) = .34.

      In order to enhance overall system performance, the memory must
be physically close to the processor.  It is not desirable to
directly immerse the memory in the nitrogen, however, since it does
not benefit as greatly from cooling to 77K.  Furthermore, the memory
dissipates much more power than the processor, and the cost of
providing additional cooling may outweigh any marginal performance
increase.

      By locating the memory directly above the cryogenic container
as shown in the figure, these conflicting objectives can be
reconciled for maxim...