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Unambiguous Ordered Listbox Insertion

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099940D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dimitrios, PP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Previously, methods such as choosing profile options "Insert before" and "Insert after", leaving a blank line at the top of the listbox, and having different control sequences have been used to handle the insertion cases discussed. This method uses one straightforward, direct action technique to support all insertion cases in an ordered-dependent listbox.

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Unambiguous Ordered Listbox Insertion

       Previously, methods such as choosing profile options
"Insert before" and "Insert after", leaving a blank line at the top
of the listbox, and having different control sequences have been used
to handle the insertion cases discussed.  This method uses one
straightforward, direct action technique to support all insertion
cases in an ordered-dependent listbox.

      The typical ordering of listbox objects is by some set
ordering, such as alphabetical, date of modification, or size.  The
usual direct action method of inserting a new object is to merely
drag it and drop it anywhere within the listbox, at which time the
modified set of objects is redrawn in the set order.  This works for
cases where the particular order of the objects is not significant.
There are cases, such as subroutine parameter and record content
lists, where the user must be able to specify the exact order of
items.

      There are three "exact order" insertion cases to be handled:
top, middle, and bottom.  In order to handle these cases in an
unambiguous way during a direct-action insertion, the cursor "hot
spot" and its relation to item lines is critical.  The cursor, which
represents the item to be inserted, must clearly indicate the
position that the new item will assume without the "hot spot" leaving
the listbox.

      A sample cursor, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, satisfies these
requirements.  Other cursors could also be used.  The s...