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Low-Temperature-Deposited Insulator for Micro-Electronics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000099967D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nguyen, TN: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby a high quality fluoro- carbon film forms an insulating deposit for integrated circuits at room temperature. The process is particularly adaptable in back-end-of-line applications, in that it requires no elevated temperature for deposition and provides a low dielectric constant film.

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Low-Temperature-Deposited Insulator for Micro-Electronics

       A technique is described whereby a high quality fluoro-
carbon film forms an insulating deposit for integrated circuits at
room temperature.  The process is particularly adaptable in
back-end-of-line applications, in that it requires no elevated
temperature for deposition and provides a low dielectric constant
film.

      The fabrication of back-end-of-line (BEOL) structures requires
the deposition of an insulator; the temperature of the substrate
allowable for the insulator deposition is restricted by the presence
of heat-sensitive materials on the nearly finished device.

      The concept described herein provides a process whereby a
material can be deposited at or near room temperature and still
maintain a low dielectric constant. The material is a high quality
fluorocar bon insulator film consisting primarily of fluorine, carbon
and hydrogen.

      To form the insulator, fluorocarbon film is deposited in a
13.56 MHz RF flexible diode plasma etching/deposition system.  The
pressure is 250 mTorr and a constant 100 sccm flow of CF4/40%H2 gas
is maintained with 200 watts of RF power applied.  A DC bias of -140
volts is formed on the capacitively coupled electrode.  In order to
avoid unintentional contamination of the insulating film, a solid
TEFLON* electrode is used as a silicon wafer support.  The deposition
rate is 15 nm/min, as measured by laser interferometry, and is not
optimized.  It should be noted that the chemical bonding and,
therefore, the insulating characteristics of the film depend
critically on the deposition con...