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Multiple Large Array Connector Alignment And Housing Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100009D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 6 page(s) / 163K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Balan, AL: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a system and devices for the system to mate thousands of connectors which interconnect a series of large boards via a network of coaxial cables. These boards are part of a computer system that arranges the boards in a bookcase style with all interconnections located on one edge. The interconnecting network of cables, up to sixty thousand, are housed in an entirely different frame. Due to the pitch of the boards, there is no access to the area of the connector and all alignment and connector joining must take place remotely.

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Multiple Large Array Connector Alignment And Housing Design

       Disclosed is a system and devices for the system to mate
thousands of connectors which interconnect a series of large boards
via a network of coaxial cables.  These boards are part of a computer
system that arranges the boards in a bookcase style with all
interconnections located on one edge.  The interconnecting network of
cables, up to sixty thousand, are housed in an entirely different
frame. Due to the pitch of the boards, there is no access to the area
of the connector and all alignment and connector joining must take
place remotely.

      There are three phases of alignment used in this design.  The
first is the major alignment of the two-connector half-mounting
members in the two frames.  Each mating half of the four arrays is
mounted on a member which holds them within a specific design range.
Four arrays (Fig. 1) are mounted on the board 1 in the board frame 2,
and the mating halves on a vertical floating bar 3 in the cable frame
4.  The board and vertical bar are aligned by a pin-in-hole
technique.  The bottom pin-in-hole consists of a round bar 5 (the
lower pin) at tached to the bottom of the board supported by
precision roller bearings 6 mounted on the board frame which
transport the bar, with the board and its arrays, into a hole 7
located in the vertical bar.  At the same time, a pin 8 in the top
of the board lines up with a vertical 9 slot in the top of the
cable array bar to complete the alignment for phase one.  This
locates the connector array halves within a specific design range for
the next phase. Continued

      The second phase of alignment (Fig. 2) takes place in the array
housings.  The cable housings 10 are allowed to float in X, Y and Z
on the bar in a specified design range, and the board housings 11 are
mounted rigidly to the board 1.  Each array housing contains pin-in-
hole 12 locators 13 positioned on the top and bottom and off the
center line of the housings to eliminate jamming if t...