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Method for Hardening Photoresist

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100135D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Yasu, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

Stability of a patterned photoresist can be improved by exposing the photoresist to UV radiation under heat to harden the photoresist. By controlling the temperature profile of the photoresist during the exposure, the time required for the stabilizing process can be substantially reduced. (Image Omitted)

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 76% of the total text.

Method for Hardening Photoresist

       Stability of a patterned photoresist can be improved by
exposing the photoresist to UV radiation under heat to harden the
photoresist.  By controlling the temperature profile of the
photoresist during the exposure, the time required for the
stabilizing process can be substantially reduced.

                            (Image Omitted)

      A photoresist which has been exposed and developed to have a
desired pattern must be resistant to high temperatures and plasma
etching which the photoresist may undergo in subsequent process
steps.  It is known that stability of the patterned photoresist can
be enhanced by subjecting it to a hardening process.  The hardening
is usually done by exposing the patterned photoresist to UV
radiation, including deep UV wavelengths, while heating the
photoresist to temperatures below the flow temperature of the
photoresist, which is the temperature at which the photoresist begins
to flow when applied thereto for 30 minutes.  In particular, the
hardening is effective to positive photoresists, such as
diazo-sensitized phenol novolak resins.

      It has been found that the time required for the hardening
process can be substantially reduced by controlling the temperature
profile of the photoresist such that the photoresist temperature at
the start of the exposure to UV radiation is slightly below the
initial flow temperature of the photoresist and the photoresist
t...