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Browse Prior Art Database

Suitcase Icon for Traveling User Support

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100140D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 109K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brewer, SC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a proposed solution for handling traveling user support on a host/intelligent workstation system. (Image Omitted). The The main problem in supplying this level of support is the question of where the user's data files should be stored, and at what point, if at all, they should be uploaded to the host from the intelligent workstation for traveling support. For performance reasons, frequently used files are often stored on the workstation, to alleviate repetitive and costly downloads from the host. When traveling, however, the user needs access to those files which are stored on the workstation, including such files as user profiles, calendars or personal address books.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Suitcase Icon for Traveling User Support

       This article describes a proposed solution for handling
traveling user support on a host/intelligent workstation system.

                            (Image Omitted)

.  The The main problem in supplying
this level of support is the question of where the user's data files
should be stored, and at what point, if at all, they should be
uploaded to the host from the intelligent workstation for traveling
support.  For performance reasons, frequently used files are often
stored on the workstation, to alleviate repetitive and costly
downloads from the host.  When traveling, however, the user needs
access to those files which are stored on the workstation, including
such files as user profiles, calendars or personal address books.

      Most software packages propose all-or-nothing solutions which
have substantial performance implications.  Either such traveling
support is not available, and the user is only able to work at one
workstation, or the support is provided by keeping duplicate copies
of every file on both the host and the workstation.  This raises
significant questions about data integrity, shadowing, the amount of
performance sacrificed for the feature, and so on.

      In addition, the current solutions make little or no allowances
for different levels of need based on user type. For example, most
secretaries never leave their workstations, and would not need
constant shadowing.  On those rare occasions when they do, they need
a way to transfer critical files to the host, so they can log in at
another workstation, such as happens when they are sitting in for
another secretary.  Managers who travel frequently need the same
capability, but may need it on a more automatic basis, so they will
not be caught in the middle of nowhere, unable to log on because they
forgot to transfer their user profile the night before they left
town.

      We propose that rather than making system-wide decisions about
the level of traveling user support provided for each user, the
individual should be able to determine the level of support desired.
An ic...