Browse Prior Art Database

Partial Page Processing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100273D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beck, JL: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Disclosed is a software algorithmic process to manage memory and page processing in a page printer to handle unlimited amounts of data on a page and in unlimited complexity. The typical recommended solution to such pages in current page printers is to reduce the complexity or size of the page. With a 2-megabyte or greater card installed in the page printer, a bit map memory sufficient to contain a full 8 x 14-inch page is established. As long as the bit map is at this size, all pages can be printed no matter their size or complexity.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Partial Page Processing

       Disclosed is a software algorithmic process to manage
memory and page processing in a page printer to handle unlimited
amounts of data on a page and in unlimited complexity.  The typical
recommended solution to such pages in current page printers is to
reduce the complexity or size of the page. With a 2-megabyte or
greater card installed in the page printer, a bit map memory
sufficient to contain a full 8 x 14-inch page is established.  As
long as the bit map is at this size, all pages can be printed no
matter their size or complexity.

      When the page printer, with a 2-megabyte or greater feature
card, is powered on, the swath memory (bit map) is configured into
two blocks of memory, each of a size to hold 8 x 7 inches of
bit data.  The remainder of the memory is allocated to the page
buffer.  As the datastream is processed, page and packet entities are
created and added to the page buffer.  Requests for memory to store
downloaded fonts or macros or to provide command work space are
serviced by taking memory from the page buffer and reducing the page
buffer.  A minimum size for the page buffer is enforced.  If memory
requests for fonts, macros or work space would cause the page buffer
to become less than the minimum, the swath memory is reduced to
'small swaths'.  Two swaths are again allocated, but each now has
only enough space for approximately 8 x .6 inches of the page.  The
freed memory is allocated to the page buffer, and the memory request
fulfilled.  When memory used by fonts, macros or command work areas
is freed, it is returned to the page buffer.  When the page buffer
again becomes sufficiently large, 'large swaths' are restored and the
page buffer s...