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Operator Interface for the Creation of Animation Sequences

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100288D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Swix, SR: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes an operator interface to define the sequence of frames an animation operation will use and the movement path that will be followed. This interface is intended for applications where a simple, repetitive sequence of animation frames is required and would normally be a component of an independent animation editor or a presentation control system, such as the LS/1 Authoring System.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Operator Interface for the Creation of Animation Sequences

       This article describes an operator interface to define
the sequence of frames an animation operation will use and the
movement path that will be followed.  This interface is intended for
applications where a simple, repetitive sequence of animation frames
is required and would normally be a component of an independent
animation editor or a presentation control system, such as the LS/1
Authoring System.

      Computer sprite animation, a technique permitting a small
graphics object or picture to be moved around the screen independent
of any other material on the screen, has become increasingly popular
for both entertainment and educational purposes which require motion.
 In some instances only a single image is moved, without variation,
such as a small arrow indicating the position of a cursor. More
complex capabilities are encountered when the object to be moved must
also change shape or form.  For example, to have a duck fly across
the screen a single image of a duck, like a photograph, can be moved.
 But this does not appear correct, since the wings are not moving as
would be expected.  To add this touch of realism, a sequence of
slightly different images is required, with the wings and body in
perhaps 3 positions, wings up, down, and in the middle.  Start first
with the wings up, then in the middle, down, middle, up, middle,
down, etc.  This provides more realistic motion.  The more frames, or
positions, the more accurate the animation appears.

      This article presents a simple manner of providing the user of
a computer animation control program to define what sequence of
frames should be used, and is tailored for use with a real-time
animation input system.  Original...