Browse Prior Art Database

Menu Icon With Hidden Geometrical Password

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100301D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pickover, CA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a computer menu icon which contains a software lock (or password) which limits access to additional function provided by the menu item. Alternatively, the password may provide additional functionality or privileges to the user, rather than simply lock the user from using the normal menu function. The menu item "looks" like any other menu item, but the menu item does not function until the user triggers a password by pointing at segments of surrounding "invisible" password areas near the sides of the menu in proper sequence. For example, the user points near the top, bottom, and right edge (in this order). This approach is better than providing a cipher lock or other flashy visible icon, since any visual indication of a lock invites users to experiment. Here the user does not know about the lock.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 59% of the total text.

Menu Icon With Hidden Geometrical Password

       Disclosed is a computer menu icon which contains a
software lock (or password) which limits access to additional
function provided by the menu item.  Alternatively, the password may
provide additional functionality or privileges to the user, rather
than simply lock the user from using the normal menu function.  The
menu item "looks" like any other menu item, but the menu item does
not function until the user triggers a password by pointing at
segments of surrounding "invisible" password areas near the sides of
the menu in proper sequence.  For example, the user points near the
top, bottom, and right edge (in this order).  This approach is better
than providing a cipher lock or other flashy visible icon, since any
visual indication of a lock invites users to experiment.  Here the
user does not know about the lock.

      As an example use, consider a menu-driven computer software
program, such as an employee records program. Users may "point" to
various menus to obtain employee information (such as department,
serial number, etc.).  Some information, such as health records,
should be restricted to users with the proper security level.  Menu
items can still be used to access such information, but they contain
a hidden password function.  The password is entered (by pointing
with a mouse) near the edges in the correct order in order to obtain
the information.  Below is an example menu icon with surrounding
inv...