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Identify All Characters That Combine With Accents to Improve Performance

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100369D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 1 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Landreth, LK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

It is becoming increasingly important to fully support character sets. Many languages are heavily accented. For performance reasons, keystrokes need to be processed as quickly as possible. When a dead accent character is entered, the next keystroke is checked to see if it will combine with the accent to create a composite (accented) character. Typically, every keystroke following the dead accent must be used to search a table of valid combinations for that particular accent.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 67% of the total text.

Identify All Characters That Combine With Accents to Improve Performance

       It is becoming increasingly important to fully support
character sets.  Many languages are heavily accented.  For
performance reasons, keystrokes need to be processed as quickly as
possible.  When a dead accent character is entered, the next
keystroke is checked to see if it will combine with the accent to
create a composite (accented) character.  Typically, every keystroke
following the dead accent must be used to search a table of valid
combinations for that particular accent.

      The keyboard layout tables for the OS/2* Extended Edition (EE)
3270 Emulator have a section for an accent table.  That accent table
is built using the EBCDIC code page supported by that table.  Many
different EBCDICs are supported in the 3270 Emulator.  For a
particular accented character, the code point may change from code
page to code page.  Because the EBCDIC code pages currently supported
are the same character set, the set of valid composite characters is
the same across all the code pages.  This means that there are many
unique accent tables (one for each EBCDIC supported).  One of those
tables is part of every keyboard layout table in the 3270 Emulator.

      In the keyboard layout tables, there are translation operations
for each keystroke.  One of those designates a key as being a dead
accent. When that character is keyed, the following keystroke is used
to search the accent tabl...