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Fabrication And Application of Beveled Structures in Optical Waveguides

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100448D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Oprysko, MM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A technique is disclosed for the rapid, large area definition of beveled structures in optical waveguides. Applications for the beveled structures include interface to receiver circuits, three-dimensional (3-D) optical wiring and waveguide to fiber interface.

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Fabrication And Application of Beveled Structures in Optical Waveguides

       A technique is disclosed for the rapid, large area
definition of beveled structures in optical waveguides. Applications
for the beveled structures include interface to receiver circuits,
three-dimensional (3-D) optical wiring and waveguide to fiber
interface.

      Optical waveguides have been shown to be a promising means for
"sending" optical information in the plane defined by the waveguides.
 However, little work has been done in using waveguides to direct
optical information into or out of the waveguide plane.  One approach
relies on the use of the physical effect of total internal reflection
of light. This is accomplished by forming a bevel at the end of the
optical waveguide at an angle such that light traveling through the
guide is totally reflected.  Microfabrication tools, such as focussed
ion beams, are of limited value because they are complicated, site
specific, and not intended for broad area or rapid processing.

      The present technique for forming beveled ends on waveguides
involves irradiating the waveguides with light at non-normal incident
angles through a mask.  The shadowing affect of the mask causes the
waveguides to be irradiated at an angle, a, as depicted in Fig. 1.
The process for forming the beveled structures can be photoablation
or photolithography.  In the former, the bevels are formed by
directly machining (i.e., removing material) the waveguides to form
the desired structure.  In the latter, the structures are defined by
lithographic exposure as in positive or negative resist systems.  In
either case, the process is as follows:
1.  Waveguides are formed on a suitable substrate (glass, quartz,
ceramic, glass ceramic, etc.).
2.  Area to be irradiated is determined by aligning and securing a
mask to the surface of the waveg...