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Sealing Cracks in Anodized Aluminum With Electrodeposited Organic Material for Dielectric Protection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100580D
Original Publication Date: 1990-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-15
Document File: 1 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Imken, RL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A technique is described using electrodeposited (electrophoretic) organic coatings for the filling of cracks at sharp transitions, such as via holes, on anodized aluminum parts used in electronic circuit card applications.

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Sealing Cracks in Anodized Aluminum With Electrodeposited Organic Material for Dielectric Protection

       A technique is described using electrodeposited
(electrophoretic) organic coatings for the filling of cracks at sharp
transitions, such as via holes, on anodized aluminum parts used in
electronic circuit card applications.

      A typical process sequence includes:
1.   Immersing anodized aluminum part in an electrodeposition
solution.  The part may be charged as either the anode or cathode to
promote the deposition of sealant colloid.
2.   Rinsing excess electrodeposition solution from the part.
3.   Drying and curing of the sealant material.

      This process of sealing cracks in anodized aluminum has
advantages over use of conventional sealing techniques, such as dip,
spray, curtain coating, or vacuum impregnation.

      Sealant is preferentially deposited in those areas requiring
dielectric protection since those openings maintain the highest
electrical potential on the part. Areas which already have adequate
dielectric protection by virtue of uniform anodization are coated to
a very slight degree while most buildup occurs in cracks and other
openings to the aluminum core.

      Parts after anodizing and rinsing may move immediately to an
electrodeposition treatment bath without requiring deracking.
Conventional sealing processes using organic sealants require some
form of coating, impregnation, and removal of excess sealant prior...