Browse Prior Art Database

Technique for Circuit Board Chip Connections Via Radio Waves

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100745D
Original Publication Date: 1990-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 3 page(s) / 106K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McLean, JG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a technique and hardware embodiment which allows a complex computer card to be assembled with a reduction in the number of electrical lines.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Technique for Circuit Board Chip Connections Via Radio Waves

       This article describes a technique and hardware
embodiment which allows a complex computer card to be assembled with
a reduction in the number of electrical lines.

      Fig. 1 shows a circuit board 1 with computer chips 2 scattered
around the board.  The chips can be placed on the board in any random
order as the data links are all done with radio waves.  Fig. 2 is a
detailed view showing one of the computer chips 2.  A voltage pin 4
and ground pin 5 are soldered to the board and also serve to
physically attach the chip to the board.  Each chip is unique for the
application that is intended.  The voltage connections, radio
transmitter 6, and radio receiver 7 are common for all chips.  This
commonality allows the radio transmitters and receiver to be built in
extremely high volume.

      Each chip has a particular frequency that it listens for; thus,
the transmitter uses a carrier frequency that is the frequency of the
chip it wishes to communicate with. The transmitter changes the paral
lel data from the chip to serial data.  It adds this serial data to
the appropriate carrier wave.  The chip with the receiver at this
frequency takes this serial data off the carrier wave and changes it
to parallel data for the chip. Very fast communication paths can
still use wires for communication, and certain chips can communicate
via wires while others do not.

      Amplitude modulation (AM) transmitters and receivers are used
for this device.  This radio wave connection technique is normally
limited to a small number of chips that are connected using radio
waves.  The entire card is enclosed with a shielded box, so that
minimal radio waves can enter or exit the card.  The antennas for
each transmitter and receiver are connected on a metal plane so that
the signal does not have to be strong to be successfully
communicated.  Using this shielded box and the built-in antennas
eliminates the concern of RF noise and interference both from the
card to the outside, and from the outside to the card.  This allows
the use of the entire electromagnetic spectrum for commu...