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Spatially-Resolved Transfer of Thin-Film Or Particle From One Substrate Surface to Another by Controlled Picosecond Flash Heating

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100783D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Tam, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Particulate organic dye films on a substrate frequently decompose or char if they are heated up sufficiently high for the purpose of transferring them from one surface to another. Such transfers can be useful in several applications, e.g., cleaning of particulate contaminants in lithographic masks, or in color printing. The problem of conventional heating techniques for dye film evaporation or transfer is that to get sufficient transfer rates and efficiencies, the dye is kept above its "boiling point" for a long time, where decomposition or chemical changes can occur. Along this line of thought, it may be argued that short "flash" heating of the film can result in non-decomposed transfer - however, it is unclear what the transfer efficiency is when the flash is very short, e.g., nanoseconds or less.

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Spatially-Resolved Transfer of Thin-Film Or Particle From One Substrate Surface to Another by Controlled Picosecond Flash Heating

       Particulate organic dye films on a substrate frequently
decompose or char if they are heated up sufficiently high for the
purpose of transferring them from one surface to another.  Such
transfers can be useful in several applications, e.g., cleaning of
particulate contaminants in lithographic masks, or in color printing.
The problem of conventional heating techniques for dye film
evaporation or transfer is that to get sufficient transfer rates and
efficiencies, the dye is kept above its "boiling point" for a long
time, where decomposition or chemical changes can occur.  Along this
line of thought, it may be argued that short "flash" heating of the
film can result in non-decomposed transfer - however, it is unclear
what the transfer efficiency is when the flash is very short, e.g.,
nanoseconds or less.  This disclosure shows that the transfer
efficiency can be very high (e.g., 80%) when 30 picosecond pulsed
laser irradiation is used, and when the fluence is in a suitable
window in the neighborhood of 30mJ/cm2.

      Patterns of particulate dye films of various colors are
obtained by marking a glass slide (sample) with various permanent ink
markers (Staedtler Lumocolor 318 WP8 markers). After drying, a blank
glass slide is put on top of the sample.  This sandwich is
illuminated with 30 picosecond laser pulses at 530 nm, with pulse
energy of about 10mJ and a spot size of about 0.3 cm2.  The
illumination can be done from the blank side (i.e., from the top or
from the sample side (i.e., from the bottom).  For the case of
illumination from the top:  some dye is transferred onto the blank,
while substantial amounts are left on the sample.  However, the
situation with illumination...