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Low-Voltage Electrography Using Monocomponent Development

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100793D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schein, LB: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is the use of monocomponent development systems optimized to work at low voltages combined with low-voltage electrography. The combination creates a new, low-cost, compact writing technology.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 71% of the total text.

Low-Voltage Electrography Using Monocomponent Development

       Disclosed is the use of monocomponent development systems
optimized to work at low voltages combined with low-voltage
electrography.  The combination creates a new, low-cost, compact
writing technology.

      Electrography is practiced commercially today by several
companies.  This printing technology uses styli spaced above a
dielectric receptor to place charges image-wise on the dielectric
receptor which are then developed by standard electrophotographic
development subsystems.  Writing with styli spaced above the
dielectric receptor usually requires several hundred volts because
air breakdown is used to generate ions.  This requires high-voltage
drivers which are expensive.

      An alternative approach to electrography is to write by
directly touching the styli to the dielectric receptor as reported,
for example, in (*).  Much lower voltages are possible; 100 volts are
claim ed in (*) using a magnetic brush development system.  The
lowest voltages possible for a practical system are determined by the
characteristics of the development system. Usually, the standard
magnetic brush development system requires 300-500 volts;
monocomponent development systems reported in the literature require
150-300 volts.  If a development system could operate at even lower
voltages, such as below 50 volts, it would be possible to use
low-voltage drivers formed on high-density integrated circuits to
dri...