Browse Prior Art Database

Real-Time, Evaporant Anomaly Recorder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100832D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brown, WW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

An instrument has been developed for inclusion in the vacuum chamber of a thin film deposition tool used in semiconductor processing. The instrument would record the rate of thin film deposition to detect "spitting" which might occur during Pb/Sn evaporation. material results in abnormalities on the wafer which may result in partial pads being formed. The proposed instrument serves to determine at what period in time such "spitting" may occur during a 70-minute evaporation cycle.

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Real-Time, Evaporant Anomaly Recorder

       An instrument has been developed for inclusion in the
vacuum chamber of a thin film deposition tool used in semiconductor
processing. The instrument would record the rate of thin film
deposition to detect "spitting" which might occur during Pb/Sn
evaporation. material results in abnormalities on the wafer which may
result in partial pads being formed.  The proposed instrument serves
to determine at what period in time such "spitting" may occur during
a 70-minute evaporation cycle.

      Referring to the figure, the instrument would be located within
the vacuum chamber 1 beneath the wafer dome 2.  Two rolls of
polyester film 3, driven by a shaft 4 and powered by an external
drive motor 5, containing a rectangular opening.  The surface speed
of the polyester film would be determined so the entire evaporation
cycle would be covered.

      As evaporation takes place from the Pb/Sn source 7 through the
source shutter 8 to the wafers 9 metal will also be deposited on the
polyester film.  When the film is rewound, it can then be inspected
to determine at exactly what time during the cycle defects occurred.
With this knowledge, corrective steps may then be taken to prevent
such "spitting", thereby leading to increased yields.