Browse Prior Art Database

Implementing Two-Dimensional Graphics in Three-Dimensional Code

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100918D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 85K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Smith, AJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Described is a software design approach for a Computer Graphics System that has to generate both two- and three-dimensional images. Drawing routine savings in code together with greater symmetry of user interface can result.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Implementing Two-Dimensional Graphics in Three-Dimensional Code

       Described is a software design approach for a Computer
Graphics System that has to generate both two- and three-dimensional
images.  Drawing routine savings in code together with greater
symmetry of user interface can result.

      Many chart types are commonly used in business graphics,
including bar charts (Fig 1), line plots (Fig 3), scatter diagrams,
surface charts (Fig 5), high/low charts, tower charts and radar
charts.  Some of these are direct derivatives of others.  A surface
chart (Fig 5) is no more than a line plot (Fig 3) with colour or
hatch fill between the line plot and the x axis.

      There has been a trend to present three-dimensional (3D)
pictures rather than traditional two-dimensional (2D) charts.  Pie
charts are commonly shown on a tilt having thickness rather than as
simple circles.  Similarly tower charts are used in place of simple
bar charts.  Three dimensional pie charts have always been a direct
derivative of their simple 2D forms, but the same has not been true
for tower charts and bar charts, each having been coded independently
with their own user interface dialogues.

      There is no logical difference between a bar chart (Fig 1) and
a tower chart (Fig 2).  The bar chart is nothing more than a specific
viewpoint on a 3D drawing.  The viewpoint is at the centre of the
picture with no perspective or depth to the drawing and no sides
visible on the bars.  Similarly, if there are multiple variables, the
bars for each variable are stacked one upon another (sometimes they
are arranged alongside one another so that smaller bars are not
hidden). Graphics code need only be developed for tower charts,
benefitting both user interface and drawing routines.  Bar chart...