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Browse Prior Art Database

Data Storage Using Ferroelectric Liquid Crystals And Scanning Micro Scopy

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100920D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 1 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Foster, J: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a high density storage device using ferroelectric liquid crystal molecules as a storage medium, and a scanning microprobe, such as the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), as the read/write head.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 75% of the total text.

Data Storage Using Ferroelectric Liquid Crystals And Scanning Micro Scopy

       Disclosed is a high density storage device using
ferroelectric liquid crystal molecules as a storage medium, and a
scanning microprobe, such as the scanning tunneling microscope (STM),
as the read/write head.

      Recent work has demonstrated that the STM is capable of imaging
a monolayer film of liquid crystal molecules with sub-nm resolution.
Since the molecules are non-conducting, it was postulated that the
STM was actually imaging the direction and magnitude of the internal
dipole moments of the molecules, rather than their topography (*).
It is proposed here that by proper choice of liquid crystal
molecules, the STM can not only read the dipole orientation, but also
select, or write, the orientation to achieve very high density data
storage.

      Ferroelectric liquid crystal molecules are organic molecules
which exist in a number of ordered liquid crystalline phases, and
also possess a permanent dipole moment. The orientation of the
molecules can therefore be selected by an electric field.  A
monolayer film is deposited on a conducting substrate by allowing the
molecules to precipitate from a bulk droplet of the liquid. As the
STM scans the monolayer film, it orients the molecules by applying
large, brief voltage pulses between the tip and the sample.  This
results in STM- written "bits" in the molecular film which encode
data according to the direction of molecular dipo...