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Omitting the Event Times in a Daily Printed Calendar Time Grid

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100948D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 3 page(s) / 117K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dennis, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Consider a computer calendar system where the user can print one or more days in a daily page format. Traditionally, these pages have a time grid where events are placed depending on the events' starting and ending times. Refer to Fig. 2 showing a typical such page. The time grid is lined at 15-minute intervals (other intervals are possible; a 15-minute interval is used in this discussion) and event descriptions are placed relative to the start time.

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Omitting the Event Times in a Daily Printed Calendar Time Grid

       Consider a computer calendar system where the user can
print one or more days in a daily page format.  Traditionally, these
pages have a time grid where events are placed depending on the
events' starting and ending times.  Refer to Fig. 2 showing a typical
such page.  The time grid is lined at 15-minute intervals (other
intervals are possible; a 15-minute interval is used in this
discussion) and event descriptions are placed relative to the start
time.

      For users where event start times do not fall on a 15-minute
interval, printing the start time is important. In Fig. 2, the
astronomical event of solar noon is such an event.  If the exact time
of solar noon were important to the user, the fact that it occurs
somewhere between 11:15 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. may not be sufficient.
For other users where the start times of the events are scheduled to
be on one of the 15-minute intervals, the placement of the event
within the trim grid is sufficient to identify it.  By omitting the
times, additional room in the grid is made for the event
descriptions, the redundancy of the start time is not printed, and,
with less printed in the relatively small grid space, the entire
calendar is made less cluttered and easier to read.  Fig. 3 shows the
same page printed without the start and end times.  Notice that
events that fall outside the time grid are printed with their start
and end times.

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