Browse Prior Art Database

Audio Navigation System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100954D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 4 page(s) / 129K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Tetzlaff, L: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a system with which the driver of an automobile can create his or her own verbally recorded directions, and easily retrieve them for audio navigation while driving.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 47% of the total text.

Audio Navigation System

       Disclosed is a system with which the driver of an
automobile can create his or her own verbally recorded directions,
and easily retrieve them for audio navigation while driving.

      Under many circumstances, navigational directions are best
supplied to a user as a sequence of verbal directions. The audio
navigational device provides a practical, easy-to-use system that
records user-supplied directions, and makes them available in a
timely, non-disruptive way.  The user divides the directions into a
series of steps.  Each step (segment) is then read separately into
the device.  While driving, the segments can be retrieved one at a
time, repeated, or backed up, as required.  All components of the
system are implemented on a single card, appropriate for
installation, e.g., in an automobile.  The system could operate as a
standalone unit, or integrated with other audio equipment in the car.

      Systems that employ visual displays or complex controls have
obvious disadvantages in a real-time navigational environment (1).
Smart systems that orient automatically from data base input are
likely to be expensive, subject to rapid obsolescence, and
cognitively problematic (2-6). While more sophisticated function
could be provided, the intent is to provide maximal utility with the
easiest possible interface.  The solution described here should be
inexpensive, parsimonious and practical.

      The external components of the system include:
1.   Microphone or microphone jack to receive voice input.
2.   Speaker with volume control to provide voice output (optional if
the sound can be channeled to existing speakers.)
3.   Sufficient memory to store a reasonable number of navigational
sequences.
4.   Function keys:
           Forward - advance one segment
           Repeat - repeat current segment
           Backward - back up one segment
           Select - select a navigational sequence. Positions the
readout mechanism to point to one of n sequences, and causes the
first segment to be read out.  Thus, in practice it would probably be
useful to have the first segment identify the sequence, e.g.,
directions to Joe's house.
           .    Sequence select buttons - one for each sequence, or a
numeric key pad with an enter key
          Enter - terminate a selection or insert sequence
          Cancel - erase an entire sequence
          Insert segment -  add if at the end, insert following, if
there are forward pointers
          Delete segment - delete segment just played

      The internal components include voice record and playback
functions, memory and a list processor that enables the functionality
described above, probably with a threaded list design.  Data
compression will be required from time to time because of fragmenting
and is assumed to be automatic.
   The key functional scenari...